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Articles by A. E Epstein
Total Records ( 2 ) for A. E Epstein
  T Yamada , H Doppalapudi , H. T McElderry , T Okada , Y Murakami , Y Inden , Y Yoshida , N Yoshida , T Murohara , A. E Epstein , V. J Plumb , S. H Litovsky and G. N. Kay
  Background—

Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) can originate from the left ventricular papillary muscles (PAMs). This study investigated the electrophysiological characteristics of these VAs and their relevance for the results of catheter ablation.

Methods and Results—

We studied 19 patients who underwent successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs originating from the anterior (n=7) and posterior PAMs (n=12). Although an excellent pace map was obtained at the first ablation site in 17 patients, radiofrequency ablation at that site failed to eliminate the VAs, and radiofrequency lesions in a relatively wide area around that site were required to completely eliminate the VAs in all patients. Radiofrequency current with an irrigated or nonirrigated 8-mm-tip ablation catheter was required to achieve a lasting ablation of the PAM VA origins. During 42% of the PAM VAs, a sharp ventricular prepotential was recorded at the successful ablation site. In 9 (47%) patients, PAM VAs exhibited multiple QRS morphologies, with subtle, but distinguishable differences occurring spontaneously and after the ablation. In 7 (78%) of those patients, radiofrequency lesions on both sides of the PAMs where pacing could reproduce an excellent match to the 2 different QRS morphologies of the VAs were required to completely eliminate the VAs.

Conclusions—

Radiofrequency catheter ablation of idiopathic PAM VAs is challenging probably because the VA origin is located relatively deep beneath the endocardium of the PAMs. PAM VAs often exhibit multiple QRS morphologies, which may be caused by a single origin with preferential conduction resulting from the complex structure of the PAMs.

  N Varma , J Michalski , A. E Epstein and R. Schweikert
  Background—

Monitoring performance of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) generators and leads is important. Methods available are with in-person evaluations or by automatic remote home monitoring (HM). These were prospectively evaluated and compared in the TRUST trial. The HM technology tested performed daily self-checks and databasing with rapid event notifications for out-of-range (including asymptomatic) conditions.

Methods and Results—

Patients (n=1339) were randomly assigned after ICD implant 2:1 to HM or to conventional groups. Both groups underwent scheduled checks every 3 months and were followed for 15 months. In HM, in-person office visits were scheduled at 3 and 15 months. At 6, 9, and 12 months, HM only was used with subsequent office visits if necessary. Between these time points, ICDs triggered event notifications for system integrity problems. Patients randomly assigned to conventional follow-up were evaluated with office visits only. HM and conventional patients were similar (age, 63.3±12.8 versus 64.0±12.1 years; 72.0% versus 73.1% male; New York Heart Association II class, 55.9% versus 60.4%; left ventricular ejection fraction, 29.0±10.7% versus 28.5±9.8%; coronary artery disease, 64.8% versus 71.7%; primary prevention, 72.2% versus 73.8%; DDD devices, 57.8% versus 56.6%). Four patients crossed over from conventional to HM because of advisories. Scheduled checks were more successfully accomplished in HM (92.7% versus 89.2% in conventional, P<0.001). Sixty-two device-related events (53 in HM versus 9 in conventional) were observed in 46 patients (40 [4.4%] in HM versus 6 [1.39%] in conventional, P=0.004). Forty-seven percent were asymptomatic. HM detected generator and lead problems earlier (HM versus conventional: median, 1 versus 5 days; P=0.05). A total of 20 device problems (eg, lead fracture, elective replacement indicators) requiring surgical revision (0.012 per patient-year) were found, 15 in HM and 5 in the conventional groups. Other events were managed nonsurgically (eg, reprogramming, initiation of antiarrhythmics).

Conclusions—

ICD lead and generator malfunction was infrequent and often asymptomatic. Only a minority of detected events required surgical intervention. Automatic HM enhanced discovery, permitted prompt detection, and facilitated management decisions. Longitudinal parameter trending, with component function evaluated daily by remote monitoring, may enable long-term performance assessment.

Clinical Trial Registration—

URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00336284.

 
 
 
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