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Articles by A. C Young
Total Records ( 2 ) for A. C Young
  L. G Biesecker , J. C Mullikin , F. M Facio , C Turner , P. F Cherukuri , R. W Blakesley , G. G Bouffard , P. S Chines , P Cruz , N. F Hansen , J. K Teer , B Maskeri , A. C Young , Manolio NISC Comparative Sequencing Program , A. F Wilson , T Finkel , P Hwang , A Arai , A. T Remaley , V Sachdev , R Shamburek , R. O Cannon and E. D. Green
 

ClinSeq is a pilot project to investigate the use of whole-genome sequencing as a tool for clinical research. By piloting the acquisition of large amounts of DNA sequence data from individual human subjects, we are fostering the development of hypothesis-generating approaches for performing research in genomic medicine, including the exploration of issues related to the genetic architecture of disease, implementation of genomic technology, informed consent, disclosure of genetic information, and archiving, analyzing, and displaying sequence data. In the initial phase of ClinSeq, we are enrolling roughly 1000 participants; the evaluation of each includes obtaining a detailed family and medical history, as well as a clinical evaluation. The participants are being consented broadly for research on many traits and for whole-genome sequencing. Initially, Sanger-based sequencing of 300–400 genes thought to be relevant to atherosclerosis is being performed, with the resulting data analyzed for rare, high-penetrance variants associated with specific clinical traits. The participants are also being consented to allow the contact of family members for additional studies of sequence variants to explore their potential association with specific phenotypes. Here, we present the general considerations in designing ClinSeq, preliminary results based on the generation of an initial 826 Mb of sequence data, the findings for several genes that serve as positive controls for the project, and our views about the potential implications of ClinSeq. The early experiences with ClinSeq illustrate how large-scale medical sequencing can be a practical, productive, and critical component of research in genomic medicine.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

 
 
 
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