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Articles by A Thompson
Total Records ( 4 ) for A Thompson
  E Di Angelantonio , R Chowdhury , N Sarwar , K. K Ray , R Gobin , D Saleheen , A Thompson , V Gudnason , N Sattar and J. Danesh
 

Background— Measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration or its precursor (N-terminal fragment [NT-proBNP]) is recommended in patients with symptoms of left ventricular dysfunction and in other settings, but the relevance of these peptides to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in general populations or in patients with stable vascular disease is uncertain.

Methods and Results— Data were collated from 40 long-term prospective studies involving a total of 87 474 participants and 10 625 incident CVD outcomes. In a comparison of individuals in the top third with those in the bottom third of baseline values of natriuretic peptides, the combined risk ratio (RR), adjusted for several conventional risk factors, was 2.82 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.40 to 3.33) for CVD. Analysis of the 6 studies with at least 250 CVD outcomes (which should be less prone to selective reporting than are smaller studies) yielded an adjusted RR of 1.94 (95% CI, 1.57 to 2.39). RRs were broadly similar with BNP or NT-proBNP (RR, 2.89 [95% CI, 1.91 to 4.38] and 2.82 [95% CI, 2.35 to 3.38], respectively) and by different baseline vascular risk (RR, 2.68 [95% CI, 2.07 to 3.47] in approximately general populations; RR, 3.35 [95% CI, 2.38 to 4.72] in people with elevated vascular risk factors; RR, 2.60 [95% CI, 1.99 to 3.38] in patients with stable CVD). Assay of BNP or NT-proBNP in addition to measurement of conventional CVD risk factors yielded generally modest improvements in risk discrimination.

Conclusions— Available prospective studies indicate strong associations between circulating concentration of natriuretic peptides and CVD risk under a range of different circumstances. Further investigation is warranted, particularly in large general population studies, to clarify any predictive utility of these markers and to better control for publication bias.

  D Saleheen , N Soranzo , A Rasheed , H Scharnagl , R Gwilliam , M Alexander , M Inouye , M Zaidi , S Potter , P Haycock , S Bumpstead , S Kaptoge , E Di Angelantonio , N Sarwar , S. E Hunt , N Sheikh , N Shah , M Samuel , S. R Haider , M Murtaza , A Thompson , R Gobin , A Butterworth , U Ahmad , A Hakeem , K. S Zaman , A Kundi , Z Yaqoob , L. A Cheema , N Qamar , A Faruqui , N. H Mallick , M Azhar , A Samad , M Ishaq , S. Z Rasheed , R Jooma , J. H Niazi , A. R Gardezi , N. A Memon , A Ghaffar , F. u Rehman , M. M Hoffmann , W Renner , M. E Kleber , T. B Grammer , J Stephens , A Attwood , K Koch , M Hussain , K Kumar , A Saleem , M. S Daood , A. A Gul , S Abbas , J Zafar , F Shahid , S. M Bhatti , S. S Ali , F Muhammad , G Sagoo , S Bray , R McGinnis , F Dudbridge , B. R Winkelmann , B Boehm , S Thompson , W Ouwehand , W Marz , P Frossard , J Danesh and P. Deloukas
  Background—

Evidence is sparse about the genetic determinants of major lipids in Pakistanis.

Methods and Results—

Variants (n=45 000) across 2000 genes were assessed in 3200 Pakistanis and compared with 2450 Germans using the same gene array and similar lipid assays. We also did a meta-analysis of selected lipid-related variants in Europeans. Pakistani genetic architecture was distinct from that of several ethnic groups represented in international reference samples. Forty-one variants at 14 loci were significantly associated with levels of HDL-C, triglyceride, or LDL-C. The most significant lipid-related variants identified among Pakistanis corresponded to genes previously shown to be relevant to Europeans, such as CETP associated with HDL-C levels (rs711752; P<10–13), APOA5/ZNF259 (rs651821; P<10–13) and GCKR (rs1260326; P<10–13) with triglyceride levels; and CELSR2 variants with LDL-C levels (rs646776; P<10–9). For Pakistanis, these 41 variants explained 6.2%, 7.1%, and 0.9% of the variation in HDL-C, triglyceride, and LDL-C, respectively. Compared with Europeans, the allele frequency of rs662799 in APOA5 among Pakistanis was higher and its impact on triglyceride concentration was greater (P-value for difference <10–4).

Conclusions—

Several lipid-related genetic variants are common to Pakistanis and Europeans, though they explain only a modest proportion of population variation in lipid concentration. Allelic frequencies and effect sizes of lipid-related variants can differ between Pakistanis and Europeans.

  K Thomas , G Harrison , S Zammit , G Lewis , J Horwood , J Heron , C Hollis , D Wolke , A Thompson and D. Gunnell
 

Background

Previous studies have suggested that impaired fetal and childhood growth are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the association of pre-adult growth with non-clinical psychotic symptoms (psychosis-like symptoms) in children is not known.

Aims

To explore the associations of body size at birth and age 7.5 years with childhood psychosis-like symptoms.

Method

Prospective cohort of children followed up from birth to age 12: the ALSPAC cohort.

Results

Data on 6000 singleton infants born after 37 weeks of gestation. A one standard deviation increase in birth weight was associated with an 18% reduction in the risk of definite psychosis-like symptoms after adjusting for age and gestation (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.73–0.92, P = 0.001). This association was partly confounded by maternal anthropometry, smoking during pregnancy, socioeconomic status and IQ. A similar association was seen for birth length and psychosis-like symptoms, which disappeared after controlling for birth weight. There was little evidence for an association of 7-year height or adiposity with psychosis-like symptoms.

Conclusions

Measures of impaired fetal, but not childhood, growth are associated with an increased risk of psychosis-like symptoms in 12-year-olds.

  S Zammit , K Thomas , A Thompson , J Horwood , P Menezes , D Gunnell , C Hollis , D Wolke , G Lewis and G. Harrison
 

Background

Adverse effects of maternal substance use during pregnancy on fetal development may increase risk of psychopathology.

Aims

To examine whether maternal use of tobacco, cannabis or alcohol during pregnancy increases risk of offspring psychotic symptoms.

Method

A longitudinal study of 6356 adolescents, age 12, who completed a semi-structured interview for psychotic symptoms in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort.

Results

Frequency of maternal tobacco use during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of suspected or definite psychotic symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 1.20, 95% CI 1.05–1.37, P = 0.007). Maternal alcohol use showed a non-linear association with psychotic symptoms, with this effect almost exclusively in the offspring of women drinking >21 units weekly. Maternal cannabis use was not associated with psychotic symptoms. Results for paternal smoking during pregnancy and maternal smoking post-pregnancy lend some support for a causal effect of tobacco exposure in utero on development of psychotic experiences.

Conclusions

These findings indicate that risk factors for development of non-clinical psychotic experiences may operate during early development. Future studies of how in utero exposure to tobacco affects cerebral development and function may lead to increased understanding of the pathogenesis of psychotic phenomena.

 
 
 
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