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Articles by A Gordon
Total Records ( 3 ) for A Gordon
  D. J Englot , L Yang , H Hamid , N Danielson , X Bai , A Marfeo , L Yu , A Gordon , M. J Purcaro , J. E Motelow , R Agarwal , D. J Ellens , J. D Golomb , M. C. F Shamy , H Zhang , C Carlson , W Doyle , O Devinsky , K Vives , D. D Spencer , S. S Spencer , C Schevon , H. P Zaveri and H. Blumenfeld
 

Impaired consciousness requires altered cortical function. This can occur either directly from disorders that impair widespread bilateral regions of the cortex or indirectly through effects on subcortical arousal systems. It has therefore long been puzzling why focal temporal lobe seizures so often impair consciousness. Early work suggested that altered consciousness may occur with bilateral or dominant temporal lobe seizure involvement. However, other bilateral temporal lobe disorders do not impair consciousness. More recent work supports a ‘network inhibition hypothesis’ in which temporal lobe seizures disrupt brainstem–diencephalic arousal systems, leading indirectly to depressed cortical function and impaired consciousness. Indeed, prior studies show subcortical involvement in temporal lobe seizures and bilateral frontoparietal slow wave activity on intracranial electroencephalography. However, the relationships between frontoparietal slow waves and impaired consciousness and between cortical slowing and fast seizure activity have not been directly investigated. We analysed intracranial electroencephalography recordings during 63 partial seizures in 26 patients with surgically confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Behavioural responsiveness was determined based on blinded review of video during seizures and classified as impaired (complex-partial seizures) or unimpaired (simple-partial seizures). We observed significantly increased delta-range 1–2 Hz slow wave activity in the bilateral frontal and parietal neocortices during complex-partial compared with simple-partial seizures. In addition, we confirmed prior work suggesting that propagation of unilateral mesial temporal fast seizure activity to the bilateral temporal lobes was significantly greater in complex-partial than in simple-partial seizures. Interestingly, we found that the signal power of frontoparietal slow wave activity was significantly correlated with the temporal lobe fast seizure activity in each hemisphere. Finally, we observed that complex-partial seizures were somewhat more common with onset in the language-dominant temporal lobe. These findings provide direct evidence for cortical dysfunction in the form of bilateral frontoparietal slow waves associated with impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures. We hypothesize that bilateral temporal lobe seizures may exert a powerful inhibitory effect on subcortical arousal systems. Further investigations will be needed to fully determine the role of cortical-subcortical networks in ictal neocortical dysfunction and may reveal treatments to prevent this important negative consequence of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  A. D Haase , S Fenoglio , F Muerdter , P. M Guzzardo , B Czech , D. J Pappin , C Chen , A Gordon and G. J. Hannon
 

Combining RNAi in cultured cells and analysis of mutant animals, we probed the roles of known Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway components in the initiation and effector phases of transposon silencing. Squash associated physically with Piwi, and reductions in its expression led to modest transposon derepression without effects on piRNAs, consistent with an effector role. Alterations in Zucchini or Armitage reduced both Piwi protein and piRNAs, indicating functions in the formation of a stable Piwi RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex). Notably, loss of Zucchini or mutations within its catalytic domain led to accumulation of unprocessed precursor transcripts from flamenco, consistent with a role for this putative nuclease in piRNA biogenesis.

  Y Erlich , K Chang , A Gordon , R Ronen , O Navon , M Rooks and G. J. Hannon
 

Next-generation sequencers have sufficient power to analyze simultaneously DNAs from many different specimens, a practice known as multiplexing. Such schemes rely on the ability to associate each sequence read with the specimen from which it was derived. The current practice of appending molecular barcodes prior to pooling is practical for parallel analysis of up to many dozen samples. Here, we report a strategy that permits simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of specimens. Our approach relies on the use of combinatorial pooling strategies in which pools rather than individual specimens are assigned barcodes. Thus, the identity of each specimen is encoded within the pooling pattern rather than by its association with a particular sequence tag. Decoding the pattern allows the sequence of an original specimen to be inferred with high confidence. We verified the ability of our encoding and decoding strategies to accurately report the sequence of individual samples within a large number of mixed specimens in two ways. First, we simulated data both from a clone library and from a human population in which a sequence variant associated with cystic fibrosis was present. Second, we actually pooled, sequenced, and decoded identities within two sets of 40,000 bacterial clones comprising approximately 20,000 different artificial microRNAs targeting Arabidopsis or human genes. We achieved greater than 97% accuracy in these trials. The strategies reported here can be applied to a wide variety of biological problems, including the determination of genotypic variation within large populations of individuals.

 
 
 
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