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Articles by A Barricarte
Total Records ( 3 ) for A Barricarte
  A. A Arslan , K. J Helzlsouer , C Kooperberg , X. O Shu , E Steplowski , H. B Bueno de Mesquita , C. S Fuchs , M. D Gross , E. J Jacobs , A. Z LaCroix , G. M Petersen , R. Z Stolzenberg Solomon , W Zheng , D Albanes , L Amundadottir , W. R Bamlet , A Barricarte , S. A Bingham , H Boeing , M. C Boutron Ruault , J. E Buring , S. J Chanock , S Clipp , J. M Gaziano , E. L Giovannucci , S. E Hankinson , P Hartge , R. N Hoover , D. J Hunter , A Hutchinson , K. B Jacobs , P Kraft , S. M Lynch , J Manjer , J. E Manson , A McTiernan , R. R McWilliams , J. B Mendelsohn , D. S Michaud , D Palli , T. E Rohan , N Slimani , G Thomas , A Tjonneland , G. S Tobias , D Trichopoulos , J Virtamo , B. M Wolpin , K Yu , A Zeleniuch Jacquotte and A. V. Patel
 

Background  Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

Methods  Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, ≥35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders.

Results  In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; Ptrend < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; Ptrend < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; Ptrend = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; Ptrend = .003) but less so in men.

Conclusions  These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

  A Agudo , M Peluso , N Sala , G Capella , A Munnia , S Piro , F Marin , R Ibanez , P Amiano , M.J Tormo , E Ardanaz , A Barricarte , M.D Chirlaque , M Dorronsoro , N Larranaga , C Martinez , C Navarro , J.R Quiros , M.J Sanchez and C. A. Gonzalez
 

Aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arylamines and heterocyclic amines require metabolic activation to form metabolites able to bind to DNA, a process mediated by polymorphic enzymes. We measured aromatic DNA adducts in white blood cells by the 32P-post-labelling assay in a sample of 296 healthy adults (147 men and 149 women) from five regions of Spain. We also analyzed functional polymorphisms in the metabolic genes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2 and SULT1A1. A significant increased level of DNA aromatic adducts was found related to the fast oxidation–hydrolysis phenotype defined by the polymorphism I462V in CYP1A1, the allele A in IVS1–154C>A of CYP1A2 and the combination Tyrosine–Arginine for Y113H and H139R of EPHX1. Geometric means (adducts per 10–9 normal nucleotides) were 2.17, 4.04 and 6.30 for slow, normal and fast phenotypes, respectively (P-trend = 0.01). Slow acetylation by NAT2 was associated with a significant decrease in adduct level; subjects with slow alleles *5A and *7A/B had in average 1.56 x 10–9adducts, as compared with 5.60 for those with normal NAT2 activity (P-value = 0.01). No association was seen with polymorphisms of other metabolic genes such as GSTM1, GSTT1 or SULT1A1. We concluded that the metabolic pathways of oxidation, hydrolysis and acetylation are relevant to the formation of bulky DNA adducts. This could suggest a potential involvement of aromatic compounds in the formation of such adducts; however, given lack of specificity of the post-labeling assay, a firm conclusion cannot be drawn.

  B Hoeft , J Linseisen , L Beckmann , K Muller Decker , F Canzian , A Husing , R Kaaks , U Vogel , M. U Jakobsen , K Overvad , R. D Hansen , S Knuppel , H Boeing , A Trichopoulou , Y Koumantaki , D Trichopoulos , F Berrino , D Palli , S Panico , R Tumino , H.B Bueno de Mesquita , F. J.B van Duijnhoven , C. H van Gils , P. H Peeters , V Dumeaux , E Lund , J. M Huerta Castano , X Munoz , L Rodriguez , A Barricarte , J Manjer , K Jirstrom , B Van Guelpen , G Hallmans , E. A Spencer , F. L Crowe , K. T Khaw , N Wareham , S Morois , M. C Boutron Ruault , F Clavel Chapelon , V Chajes , M Jenab , P Boffetta , P Vineis , T Mouw , T Norat , E Riboli and A. Nieters
 

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three hundred and ninety two single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected using pairwise tagging with an r2 cutoff of 0.8 and a minor allele frequency of >5%. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Haplotype analysis was performed using a generalized linear model framework. On the genotype level, hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(NAD) (HPGD), phospholipase A2 group VI (PLA2G6) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 were associated with higher risk for CRC, whereas prostaglandin E receptor 2 (PTGER2) was associated with lower CRC risk. A significant inverse association (P < 0.006) was found for PTGER2 GGG haplotype, whereas HPGD AGGAG and PLA2G3 CT haplotypes were significantly (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively) associated with higher risk of CRC. Based on these data, we present for the first time the association of HPGD variants with CRC risk. Our results support the key role of prostanoid signaling in colon carcinogenesis and suggest a relevance of genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism-related genes and CRC risk.

 
 
 
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