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Pakistan Journal of Nutrition

Year: 2019  |  Volume: 18  |  Issue: 5  |  Page No.: 437 - 442

The Combined Effects of Fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Neurospora crassa and Fermentation Time to Improve the Quality and Nutrient Content of Palm Oil Sludge

Mirnawati, Gita Ciptaan and Ade Djulardi

Abstract

Background and Objective: Palm oil sludge, as a byproduct of the palm oil industry, is an agricultural waste product that can be used as an alternative feedstuff for poultry. Palm oil sludge also contains nutrients that can be used as feed ingredients for poultry. Palm oil sludge is limited in use in broiler rations because of its low quality and nutrient content. For this reason, it is necessary to process palm oil sludge by fermentation methods to improve the quality and the nutrient content. This study aimed to determine the combined effect of fungi (P. chrysosporium and N. crassa) and fermentation time to improve the quality of fermented palm oil sludge. Materials and Methods: The materials used in this study were palm oil sludge, the fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Neurospora crassa and fermentation materials and tools. This experimental study used a completely randomized design (CRD) with a 3×3 factorial pattern with 3 replications. The treatments consisted of factor A (combination of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Neurospora crassa), which consisted of A1 (3:1), A2 (3:2) and A3 (4:1) and factor B (fermentation time), which consisted of B1 (7 days), B2 (10 days) and B3 (13 days). Results: The results of the analysis of variance showed that there was a significant interaction (p<0.05) between factor A and factor B. Each factor A and B showed a significant effect (p<0.05). Conclusion: In this study, it was concluded that the combination of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Neurospora crassa (4:1) and 13 days of fermentation time provided optimal results, with 26.20% crude protein, 14.49% crude fiber, 14.54% lignin, 58.20% nitrogen retention and 57.66% crude fiber digestibility.

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