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Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences
Year: 2006  |  Volume: 9  |  Issue: 14  |  Page No.: 2546 - 2555

An Ethnomedicinal Inventory of Plants Used for Family Planning and Sex Diseases Treatment in Samahni Valley, (A.K.) Pakistan

Ch. Muhammad Ishtiaq, M.A. Khan and Wajahat Hanif    

Abstract: Indigenous plants are indirectly associated to the culture and traditions of the local peoples. About 36 plant species, distributed in 26 families were used to treat sexual diseases and control birth rate, in Samahni valley (A.K.) Pakistan. The most of these plants grow wild (55.55%), are indigenous (61.11%) and herbs (52.77%). The plant parts frequently used are seed (22.72 %), root (20.45%), fruit, leaf and whole plant (9.09%) each. Medications are mostly prepared as decoctions and infusions. Most of curative species reported here are directed to control family size and treat sexual diseases; syphilis, leucorrhoea, menorrhagia, amenorrhoea, blennorrhoea, haemorrhoids, hydrocoele and regularise menses. The results of this study showed that people are still dependent on medicinal plants in this rural area of Samahni valley. The study enlightens how data of ethnomedicinal inventory of medicinal plants can be used effectively at local and regional level for phytochemical and pharmacological research. The study area due to unplanned exploitation had resulted in loss of medicinally important plant species. It was concluded that afforestation programme followed by proper protection is need of time.

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