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Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging
Year: 2010  |  Volume: 3  |  Issue: 5  |  Page No.: 515 - 519

Periaortic Fat Deposition Is Associated With Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Framingham Heart Study

C. S Fox, J. M Massaro, C. L Schlett, S. J Lehman, J. B Meigs, C. J O'Donnell, U Hoffmann and J. M. Murabito    

Abstract: Background—

Central obesity is associated with peripheral arterial disease, suggesting that ectopic fat depots may be associated with localized diseases of the aorta and lower-extremity arteries. We hypothesized that persons with greater amounts of periaortic fat are more likely to have clinical PAD and a low ankle-brachial index.

Methods and Results—

We quantified periaortic fat surrounding the thoracic aorta using a novel volumetric quantitative approach in 1205 participants from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort (mean age, 65.9 years; women, 54%); visceral abdominal fat also was measured. Clinical peripheral arterial disease was defined as a history of intermittent claudication, and ankle-brachial index was dichotomized as low (≤0.9) or lower-extremity revascularization versus normal (>0.9 to <1.4). Regression models were created to examine the association between periaortic fat and intermittent claudication or low ankle-brachial index (n=66). In multivariable logistic regression, per 1 SD increase in periaortic fat, the odds ratio for the combined end point was 1.52 (P=0.004); these results were strengthened with additional adjustment for body mass index (odds ratio, 1.69; P=0.002) or visceral abdominal fat (odds ratio, 1.67; P=0.009), whereas no association was observed for visceral abdominal fat (P=0.16). Similarly, per SD increase in body mass index or waist circumference, no association was observed after accounting for visceral abdominal fat (body mass index, P=0.35; waist circumference, P=0.49).

Conclusions—

Periaortic fat is associated with low ABI and intermittent claudication.

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