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Carcinogenesis
Year: 2009  |  Volume: 30  |  Issue: 9  |  Page No.: 1614 - 1619

Role of NKX2-1 in N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)-nitrosamine-induced thyroid adenoma in mice

S Hoshi, N Hoshi, M Okamoto, J Paiz, T Kusakabe, J. M Ward and S. Kimura    

Abstract:

NKX2-1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is critical for genesis of the thyroid and transcription of the thyroid-specific genes. Nkx2-1-thyroid-conditional hypomorphic mice were previously developed in which Nkx2-1 gene expression is lost in 50% of the thyroid cells. Using this mouse line as compared with wild-type and Nkx2-1 heterozygous mice, a thyroid carcinogenesis study was carried out using the genotoxic carcinogen N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)-nitrosamine (DHPN), followed by sulfadimethoxine (SDM) or the non-genotoxic carcinogen amitrole (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole). A significantly higher incidence of adenomas was obtained in Nkx2-1-thyroid-conditional hypomorphic mice as compared with the other two groups of mice only when they were treated with DHPN + SDM, but not amitrole. A bromodeoxyuridine incorporation study revealed that thyroids of the Nkx2-1-thyroid-conditional hypomorphic mice had >2-fold higher constitutive cell proliferation rate than the other two groups of mice, suggesting that this may be at least partially responsible for the increased incidence of adenoma in this mouse line after genotoxic carcinogen exposure. Thus, NKX2-1 may function to control the proliferation of thyroid follicular cells following damage by a genotoxic carcinogen.

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