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Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology

Year: 2009  |  Volume: 29  |  Issue: 6  |  Page No.: 857 - 862

Human Placental Ectonucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase Gene Transfer via Gelatin-Coated Stents Prevents In-Stent Thrombosis

Y Takemoto, H Kawata, T Soeda, K Imagawa, S Somekawa, Y Takeda, S Uemura, M Matsumoto, Y Fujimura, J. i Jo, Y Kimura, Y Tabata and Y. Saito

Abstract

Background— In-stent thrombosis is mainly triggered by adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-dependent platelet aggregation after percutanous coronary stent implantation. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) rapidly hydrolyzes ADP to adenosine monophosphate, inhibiting platelet aggregation. We tested the hypothesis that local delivery of human placental E-NTPDase (pE-NTPDase) gene into injured arteries via gene-eluting stent could prevent subacute in-stent thrombosis.

Methods and Results— We generated gene-eluting stents by coating bare metal stents with cationic gelatin hydrogel containing pE-NTPDase cDNA (pE-NTPDase stent), and implanted the stents into rabbit femoral arteries (FA) prone to production of platelet-rich thrombi due to repeated balloon injury at 4-week intervals. After the second injury, E-NTPDase gene expression was severely decreased; however, the implantation of pE-NTPDase stent increased E-NTPDase mRNA levels and NTPDase activity to higher level than normal FA. The FAs with pE-NTPDase stents maintained patency in all rabbits (P<0.01), whereas the stent-implanted FAs without pE-NTPDase gene showed low patency rates (17% to 25%). The occlusive platelet-rich thrombi, excessive neointimal growth, and infiltration of macrophages were inhibited in stent implanted FA with pE-NTPDase gene, but not without pE-NTPDase gene.

Conclusions— Human pE-NTPDase gene transfer via cationic gelatin-coated stents inhibited subacute in-stent thrombosis and suppressed neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation without antiplatelet drugs.

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