Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Science Alert
 
Blue
   
Curve Top
Research Journal of Microbiology
  Year: 2011 | Volume: 6 | Issue: 8 | Page No.: 669-677
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail

Adhesion of E. coli and E. coli O157: H7 Isolates from a Typical Tropical Abattoir on Wood, Steel and Glass Surfaces

Victoria Olusola Adetunji and Tajudeen Opeyemi Isola

Abstract:
Adhesion of bacteria to meat processing surfaces may act as potential sources of transmission of pathogens in meat industry. Several studies have shown that adhesion of bacteria to surfaces partly depends upon the nature of the inert surfaces and partly upon the bacterial surface properties. The aim of this study was to compare the adhesion of E. coli and E. coli O157: H7 on wood, glass and steel surfaces. Twenty abattoir isolates of E. coli (8) and E. coli O157:H7 (12) from meat tables in Ibadan municipal abattoir, Nigeria were assayed for bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion was assessed on wood, glass and steel surfaces at ambient temperature for 24 and 72 h. Attachment to surfaces was quantified using a crystal violet binding assay. In this study, E. coli isolates adhered on all the three surfaces studied, viz. wood, glass and steel. The isolates varied in their ability to adhere to the surfaces. The adhesion by isolates at 24 and 72 h were significantly different (p<0.05). The mean absorbance values (nm) at 24 h showed that E. coli O157:H7 (SEH1) adhere more bacterial cells on wood (0.51±0.02), steel (0.15±0.00) and glass (0.12±0.01) surfaces than E. coli (SE) which was wood (0.38±0.02), steel (0.13±0.01) and glass (0.07±0.01). At 24 and 72 h, a significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between the isolates for wood and glass. However, at 24 h, a significant difference (p<0.01) ensued between E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli for steel. E. coli and E. coli O157:H7 adhere more bacterial cells on wood than on steel and glass. Bacterial adhesion is influenced by strains with high virulence factors and an extension of incubating period. Proper surface selection can reduce the ability of bacteria adhesion on meat contact surfaces.
PDF Fulltext XML References Citation Report Citation
 RELATED ARTICLES:
  •    Microtitre Plate Assay for the Quantification of Biofilm Formation by Pathogenic Leptospira
  •    Flourogenic Assays for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli in Tap Water and Raw Milk Samples
  •    Growth Stimulatory Effects of Enterobacter and Serratia Isolated from Biofilms on Plant Growth and Soil Aggregation
  •    In vitro Activity of Four Common Essential Oil Components against Biofilm-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  •   

Resistance of Bacillus cereus and E. coli Towards Lead, Copper, Iron, Manganese and Arsenic

How to cite this article:

Victoria Olusola Adetunji and Tajudeen Opeyemi Isola, 2011. Adhesion of E. coli and E. coli O157: H7 Isolates from a Typical Tropical Abattoir on Wood, Steel and Glass Surfaces. Research Journal of Microbiology, 6: 669-677.

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jm.2011.669.677

COMMENT ON THIS PAPER
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
Curve Bottom