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Journal of Agronomy
  Year: 2016 | Volume: 15 | Issue: 2 | Page No.: 58-67
DOI: 10.3923/ja.2016.58.67
 
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Growth, Biochemical Constituents, Micronutrient Uptake and Yield Response of six Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) Cultivars Grown under Salinity Stress

A.E. Nouck, V.D. Taffouo, E. Tsoata, D.S. Dibong, S.T. Nguemezi, I. Gouado and E. Youmbi

Abstract:
The impact of stress caused by NaCl on the growth, yield, micronutrient acquisition and the biochemical constituents of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) cultivars exhibiting differences in salt-tolerance was examined in a greenhouse and field conditions. Plants were subjected to four levels of NaCl (0, 50, 100 and 200 mM). Results showed a significant reduction (p<0.05) of dry weights of roots, shoots and whole plants, number of fruit per plant, flowering time, fruit yield, fruit weight per plant, number of flowers per plant and harvest index in cvs. Xewel, Mongal, Jaquar and Nadira (salt-sensitive) at 50 mM NaCl while those parameters were drastically decreased by salinity in salt-moderately tolerant cv. Ninja and salt-tolerant cv. Lindo at 100 and 200 mM NaCl, respectively. The NaCl addition leads to a decrease of Cu, Zn and Fe contents in leaves of all cultivars while soluble proteins (PR), carbohydrates (CH), total Free Amino Acids (FAA) especially proline (PRO) contents significantly (p<0.05) increased in leaves of cv. Lindo than others. The main strategy of salt-tolerance in cv. Lindo seems to be increased osmotic adjustment through the strongly accumulation of PR, CH and PRO in leaves. The PR, CH and PRO could be used as potential biochemical indicators of early selection and osmotic adjustment ability for salt-tolerant plants. Results also showed a relatively higher tolerance of cv. Lindo to all yield components and micronutrient uptake than others, suggesting that Lindo cultivar could increase tomato production on salt affected soils.
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How to cite this article:

A.E. Nouck, V.D. Taffouo, E. Tsoata, D.S. Dibong, S.T. Nguemezi, I. Gouado and E. Youmbi, 2016. Growth, Biochemical Constituents, Micronutrient Uptake and Yield Response of six Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) Cultivars Grown under Salinity Stress. Journal of Agronomy, 15: 58-67.

DOI: 10.3923/ja.2016.58.67

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ja.2016.58.67

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