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Trends in Applied Sciences Research
  Year: 2006 | Volume: 1 | Issue: 4 | Page No.: 341-349
DOI: 10.3923/tasr.2006.341.349
 
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Response of Single Species with Allee Effect to Accumulative Effects of Human Activities and its Forecast a Case Study of the Oriental White Stork

Hui-Yu Liu, Zhen-Shan Lin and Hong-Yu Liu

Abstract:
The scaling of environmental capacity of single species (K) with the number of patches (P) has been introduced by applying scaling theory in this paper based on the investigated data of Oriental White Storks in Naoli River basin in China. The maximum capacity of Oriental White Storks scales the number of patches to power 0.71, i.e., Ka P0.71. In the meantime, by incorporating the scaling relation into non-autonomous population model for single species with Allee effect under the accumulative effects of human activities, we simulated the population dynamics of the Oriental White Stork. The simulation results show that the Oriental White Stork is a living dead species; there is about 100 year time debt for its extinction to respond to the past habitat loss and fragmentation. To avoid the extinction of Oriental White Storks, habitat quality must be improved instead of holding current quality. By comparisons of different cases of improving habitat, we find that the changes of average patch area have more significant effects on the persistence of Oriental White Storks than the changes of the number of patches on condition that the changes of total areas are equal. Decreasing the number of patches is favorable to the persistence of the Oriental White Stork. At the same time, a larger reserve is more propitious to the Oriental White Stork`s long-term persistence than several smaller reserves with the same area.
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How to cite this article:

Hui-Yu Liu, Zhen-Shan Lin and Hong-Yu Liu , 2006. Response of Single Species with Allee Effect to Accumulative Effects of Human Activities and its Forecast a Case Study of the Oriental White Stork. Trends in Applied Sciences Research, 1: 341-349.

DOI: 10.3923/tasr.2006.341.349

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=tasr.2006.341.349

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