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Journal of Environmental Science and Technology
  Year: 2008 | Volume: 1 | Issue: 4 | Page No.: 187-200
DOI: 10.3923/jest.2008.187.200
Effects of Arranging Forest Fuel Reduction Treatments in Spatial Patterns on Hypothetical, Simulated, Human-Caused Wildfires
Young-Hwan Kim and Pete Bettinger

Abstract:
In this research, we simulated wildfires that originated from hypothetical human-caused ignition points to determine whether a broad-scale schedule of fuel reduction treatments would be effective in reducing wildfire size or severity. The study area was a large watershed in Northeastern Oregon (USA). The fuel reduction treatments included commercial thinning and thinning followed by a prescribed fire treatment. These fuel reduction treatments were distributed across the landscape in such a way as to simultaneously maximize both an even-flow of timber harvest volume and a spatial pattern of activity (dispersed, clumped, random and regular). We found that the clumped and regular patterns of management activity seemed to reduce simulated wildfire severity most effectively in two out of three cases. A dispersed pattern of management activity required scheduling more area for treatment since treatments spaced as far apart as possible produced lower scheduled timber volumes, thus had no recognizable effect. A random pattern of fuel reduction activities also seemed to have no effect on characteristics of simulated human-caused wildfires.
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How to cite this article:

Young-Hwan Kim and Pete Bettinger, 2008. Effects of Arranging Forest Fuel Reduction Treatments in Spatial Patterns on Hypothetical, Simulated, Human-Caused Wildfires. Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 1: 187-200.

DOI: 10.3923/jest.2008.187.200

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jest.2008.187.200

 
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