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Journal of Entomology
  Year: 2013 | Volume: 10 | Issue: 2 | Page No.: 53-65
DOI: 10.3923/je.2013.53.65
 
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Effects of UV-B and Solar Radiation on the Efficacy of Isaria fumosorosea and Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycetes: Hyphomycetes) for Controlling Bagworm, Pteroma pendula (Lepidoptera: Psychidae)

Cheong Yew Loong, Ahmad Said Sajap, Hafidzi Mohd Noor, Dzolkifli Omar and Faizah Abood

Abstract:
One of the impediments to the success of entomopathogenic fungi for controlling insect pests in the field is their sensitivity to solar radiation, UV-B in particular. Their sensitivity to UV, however, can be minimized by adding materials that can block the radiation from reaching the conidia. In this study, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin and Isaria fumosorosea (Wize) isolated from field collected bagworms, Pteroma pendula (Joannis) (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) were formulated with UV protectants and tested for their pathogenicity on their original host. Both fungi were infective to the bagworms. The median effective concentrations (EC50) were 2x105.10 and 2x105.17 conidia mL-1 for I. fumosorosea and M. anisopliae, respectively. At concentration of 2x109 conidia mL-1 of either I. fumosorosea or M. anisopliae recorded the lowest LT50 values at 5.72 and 5.40 days, respectively. Less than 10% of the conidia germinated after 12 h of exposure to UV-B and solar radiation. When the conidia were formulated as a wettable powder in kaolin, with or without Tinopal LPW, a significant sunlight radiation and UV-B protection was achieved up to 12 h of exposure. More than 80% of the conidia germinated. Tinopal LPW, however, did not significantly improve efficacy of the formulation, although recorded a better conidia protection than those without Tinopal LPW. A field trial using M. anisopliae and I. fumosorosea conidia without Tinopal LPW achieved 58 and 68% control, respectively, while Dipel®, a Bacillus thuringiensis product, exceeded 80% control. Even though both isolates were less effective than Dipel® but these indigenous pathogens could effectively reduced the pest population to less than 50%. They need to be conserved and/or augmented so that bagworms can be suppressed with minimal disruption to the ecological balance.
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How to cite this article:

Cheong Yew Loong, Ahmad Said Sajap, Hafidzi Mohd Noor, Dzolkifli Omar and Faizah Abood, 2013. Effects of UV-B and Solar Radiation on the Efficacy of Isaria fumosorosea and Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycetes: Hyphomycetes) for Controlling Bagworm, Pteroma pendula (Lepidoptera: Psychidae). Journal of Entomology, 10: 53-65.

DOI: 10.3923/je.2013.53.65

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=je.2013.53.65

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