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Journal of Biological Sciences
  Year: 2012 | Volume: 12 | Issue: 3 | Page No.: 186-191
DOI: 10.3923/jbs.2012.186.191
Dry Season Refugia Breeding Ecology of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Minna, North Central Nigeria
I.K. Olayemi, B. Idris, I.C.J. Omalu and O.M. Odeyemi

Abstract:
This study was carried out in Minna, Nigeria, to elucidate the dry season breeding ecology of mosquitoes in the area thus, providing a basis for all-year-round effective implementation of informed larviciding interventions. Mosquito larvae were sampled bi-weekly between the hours of 0800 and 1100 from randomly selected larval breeding habitats in the city, using a 350 mL capacity Dipper. The physical characteristics of the selected habitats were evaluated and related to larval productivity. The results indicated that Anopheles mosquitoes constituted 55.00% of all larvae collected, followed by Culex (36.29%) and Aedes (17.49%). The patterns of mean monthly density distribution of the three mosquito Genera were similar, i.e., decreasing significantly (p<0.05) from the beginning to the end of the dry season. The mosquito types showed significant (p<0.05) preferences for certain habitats, with Anopheles and Aedes preferring the Drains (24.40±5.13 and 14.20±5.12 larvae/sampling day, respectively) and Culex mosquitoes encountered more frequently in the Swamps (16.80±6.22 larvae/sampling day). The Drains were the most productive habitats, accounting for over 50% larval production during the period, distantly followed by the Swamp (31.60±16.38 larvae/sampling day) while, the densities of larvae in the Wells and Rivers were significantly low (7.40±7.79 and 3.40±5.24 larvae/sampling day, respectively). Again, in terms of physical attributes, the Drains were the most ideal habitat for larval development, been relatively small (diameter = 2.30±0.00 m); most shallow (depth = 0.14±0.01 m); warmest (27.52±0.48°C) and nearest to human habitations (2.80±0.00 m). The epidemiological implications of these results were discussed and concluded that targeting dry season larviciding interventions at the productive larval breeding habitats will go a long way in reducing the menace of mosquito-borne diseases in Minna.
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How to cite this article:

I.K. Olayemi, B. Idris, I.C.J. Omalu and O.M. Odeyemi, 2012. Dry Season Refugia Breeding Ecology of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Minna, North Central Nigeria. Journal of Biological Sciences, 12: 186-191.

DOI: 10.3923/jbs.2012.186.191

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jbs.2012.186.191

COMMENTS
12 June, 2012
Abdullahi Ahmed Yusuf:
This is a very interesting study which provides insights into the ecology of mosquitoes in Minna North Central Nigeria. Results from such a study often comes in handy as baselines for applying or starting intervention programmes. We need such studies (especially on a long term) on the indigenous mosquito fauna in Nigeria where cases of malaria morbidity and mortality are high.
 
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