Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Science Alert
 
Blue
   
Curve Top
Journal of Applied Sciences
  Year: 2016 | Volume: 16 | Issue: 11 | Page No.: 534-541
DOI: 10.3923/jas.2016.534.541
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail

Heavy Metals in Sediments and Their Transfer to Edible Mollusc

Kouakou Adjoumani Rodrigue, N`Guessan Louis Berenger Kouassi, Benjamin Kouassi Yao, Albert Trokourey and Kopoin Adouby

Abstract:
Background and Objective: Vridi canal is subjected to intense human activities because it represents the only way to entry and exit from the largest harbour of Côte d’Ivoire. However, no study has been conducted on the metal contamination in this zone. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to assess metals concentrations, to determine the mobility and bioavailability of cadmium, copper and zinc in the sediments and their influence on bioaccumulation inedible mollusc. Materials and Methods: Sediments and gastropod (Purpurea haemastostoma) samples from Vridi canal were seasonally collected between February, 2014 and September, 2015. Sequential extraction was used to determine the mobility and bioavailability of cadmium, copper and zinc. Analysis of variance carried out to observe the effect of season and Pearson correlation to show the relationship between these metals in Purpurea haemastostoma and those of bioavailable fractions in sediments. Results: The results showed that the Vridi canal sediments had the high contents of cadmium (1.95-8.35 mg kg–1) and zinc (19.48-242.09 mg kg–1). The results of the sequential extraction showed that copper (62.21-67.84%) and zinc (54.48-55.19) were mainly found in the residual fraction in sediments during dry season, rainy season and flooding season. Concerning the cadmium (24.45-36.81%), it prevailed in the exchangeable fraction during the three seasons. Total concentrations of cadmium and zinc in Purpurea haemastostoma exceeded the maximum permissible levels, according to Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Pearson correlation showed that the concentration of cadmium and zinc in the bioavailable fractions in sediments influenced the bioaccumulation in edible mollusc. Conclusion: These results suggest that copper and zinc were much less mobile, bioavailable and toxic to organisms in the aquatic environment while cadmium was highly mobile, bioavailable and toxic. However, the bioavailable fractions of cadmium and zinc are bioaccumulated in Purpurea haemastostoma. There is a risk for human consumption of this gastropod.
PDF Fulltext XML References Citation Report Citation
How to cite this article:

Kouakou Adjoumani Rodrigue, N`Guessan Louis Berenger Kouassi, Benjamin Kouassi Yao, Albert Trokourey and Kopoin Adouby, 2016. Heavy Metals in Sediments and Their Transfer to Edible Mollusc. Journal of Applied Sciences, 16: 534-541.

DOI: 10.3923/jas.2016.534.541

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jas.2016.534.541

COMMENT ON THIS PAPER
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Curve Bottom