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Journal of Applied Sciences
  Year: 2002 | Volume: 2 | Issue: 8 | Page No.: 831-834
DOI: 10.3923/jas.2002.831.834
 
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Oviposition Preference and Infestation of Yellow Stem Borer in Rice Varieties
Maqsood A. Rustamani , Muzaffar A. Talpur , Rab Dino Khuhro and Hussain Bux Baloch

Abstract:
Five coarse grain rice varieties (IR-6, IR–6- 18, IR-8, Shadab, Shua-92) and five fine grain varieties (Basmati-370, Jajai-33, Jajai-77, Sonahri Sugdasi, Sonahri Sugdasi-5) were examined to determine the oviposition preferences and infestation of yellow stem borer in the experimental field of Nuclear Institute of Agriculture (NIA) at Tandojam during (Kharif) 2001. A differential response of varieties was observed towards the ovipostion preference by borer. Shua-92 variety was least preferred and Sonahri Sugdasi as most preferred for oviposition. Two oviposition peaks were recorded, the first one during vegetative growth period and other during reproduction period. The population infestation trend showed that amongst the coarse grain varieties Shadab was comparatively less susceptible and IR-6 susceptible to borer attack, whereas, amongst the varieties of fine grain, Basmati-370 and Sonahri Sugdasi suffered less damage of borer. The oviposition had positive significant correlation with dead hearts and white heads whereas, borer infestation had negative significant correlation with yield.
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How to cite this article:

Maqsood A. Rustamani , Muzaffar A. Talpur , Rab Dino Khuhro and Hussain Bux Baloch , 2002. Oviposition Preference and Infestation of Yellow Stem Borer in Rice Varieties. Journal of Applied Sciences, 2: 831-834.

DOI: 10.3923/jas.2002.831.834

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jas.2002.831.834

COMMENTS
30 May, 2009
Dr.V.Nandagopal:
This whole exercise was done under field conditions, where lots of other factors operate on both plant and target insects.

This should have been additionally done by artificial inoculation either by egg implantations or by emerged neonate larvae or by artificial infestation-a method recently dveloped by CRRI, Cuttack, Orissa, India 753006 -the article is being submitted to crop protection journal.
 
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