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American Journal of Food Technology
  Year: 2010 | Volume: 5 | Issue: 4 | Page No.: 269-274
DOI: 10.3923/ajft.2010.269.274
Control of Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella) on Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var capitata) using Intercropping with Non-Host Crops
E. Asare-Bediako, A.A. Addo-Quaye and A. Mohammed

Abstract:
This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of intercropping cabbage with non-host crops in reducing the effect of the diamondback moth pest on cabbage. The experimental design used was a randomized complete block design with five treatments and four replications. The treatments were cabbage-tomato intercrop, cabbage-pepper intercrop, cabbage-onion intercrop, pure cabbage stand sprayed with chlorpyrifos (Dursban) a synthetic insecticide and a pure cabbage stand that was not sprayed (control). Data were taken on plant height, DBM population per plant, leaf damage, head damage and head weight. Cabbage plants intercropped or sprayed with chlorpyrifos against the DBM pests recorded significantly higher growth and yield and less pest damage compared with controls. Intercropping cabbage with onion, tomato or pepper was found to be as effective as spraying the cabbage with chlorpyrifos. Cabbage intercropped with onion and tomato produced lower leaf and head damage and higher yield than those intercropped with pepper.
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How to cite this article:

E. Asare-Bediako, A.A. Addo-Quaye and A. Mohammed, 2010. Control of Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella) on Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var capitata) using Intercropping with Non-Host Crops. American Journal of Food Technology, 5: 269-274.

DOI: 10.3923/ajft.2010.269.274

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajft.2010.269.274

COMMENTS
06 March, 2011
Runyararo:
I enjoyed reading your article on the internet. My question is that if these non host plants are affected by diseases how wil you control them when you are after cultural control?
 
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