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Asian Journal of Biotechnology
  Year: 2020 | Volume: 12 | Issue: 2 | Page No.: 56-64
DOI: 10.3923/ajbkr.2020.56.64
 
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Biological Control of Foodborne Pathogenic Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus sp. Using Different Spice Extracts Available in Bangladesh

Badhan Sarker, Afrin Priya Talukder, Md. Akhtar-E-Ekram, Md. Salah Uddin, Md. Abu Saleh and Shahriar Zaman

Abstract:
Background and Objective: The relatively inexpensive, widely available poultry meat and eggs can be of centralimportance to meet shortfalls in essential nutrients, particularly to impoverished people. Contamination of foods by pathogenic microbes causes consumer illness. In this study, antibacterial activity of spice extracts against isolated foodborne pathogenic bacterial strains were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Egg and meat samples were collected from poultry egg and meat retailers of local market and screened on MacConkey and Mannitol salt agar media, respectively. The isolates were identified by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Anti-bacterial activity of different spice extracts against isolated bacteria was tested through disc diffusion method. Cytotoxicity was evaluated through probit mortality analysis software. Results: Bacillus sp. (from meat) showed more toxicity (LC50 = 95.6205 μL mL1) than Enterobacter sp. (from egg) (LC50 = 143.2504 μL mL1) against Artemia salina. For biological control, methanolic and aqueous extracts of Cinnamomum verum, Syzygium aromaticum, Piper chaba, Zingiber officinale were used. Methanolic extract of S. aromaticum acted as potential antimicrobial agent against Bacillus sp. with a inhibition zones of 15±0, 18.33±0.58 and 21±0 mm at a concentration of 50, 75, 100 μg mL1, respectively. Similarly, Enterobacter sp. was susceptible at the same doses with a inhibition zones of 15.33±0.58, 16.67±0.58 and 18±0 mm. Moreover, C. verum oil with a dose of 30 μL showed the highest growth inhibitory effect against Bacillus sp. (inhibition zone 40±1 mm) than Enterobacter sp. (inhibition zone 34.33±1.53 mm). Conclusion: The result suggests that spices represent an alternative source of natural antibacterial substances for inhibiting the growth of foodborne bacteria.
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How to cite this article:

Badhan Sarker, Afrin Priya Talukder, Md. Akhtar-E-Ekram, Md. Salah Uddin, Md. Abu Saleh and Shahriar Zaman, 2020. Biological Control of Foodborne Pathogenic Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus sp. Using Different Spice Extracts Available in Bangladesh. Asian Journal of Biotechnology, 12: 56-64.

DOI: 10.3923/ajbkr.2020.56.64

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajbkr.2020.56.64

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