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Asian Journal of Biochemistry
  Year: 2009 | Volume: 4 | Issue: 3 | Page No.: 77-87
DOI: 10.3923/ajb.2009.77.87
Characterization of a Capsicum chinense Seed Peptide Fraction with Broad Antibacterial Activity
L. Brito-Argaez, F. Moguel-Salazar, F. Zamudio, T. Gonzalez-Estrada and I. Islas-Flores

Abstract:
Habanero chili pepper (Capsicum chinense) is widely consumed as a fresh vegetable, although its extremely high capsaicin content has led to other uses (e.g., medicine and self-defense). Recently described antimicrobial peptides from C. annuum were very efficient in inhibiting growth in human and plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi. In order to explore the potential use of Capsicum chinense seeds as a source of antimicrobial peptides, in the present study a peptide fraction from C. chinense pepper seeds, denominated G10P1, was enriched, partially purified and its antimicrobial activity tested against the plant and human pathogens Xanthomonas campestris, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Erwinia carotovora, Agrobacterium sp., Shigella flexnerii, Escherichia coli, Staphyllococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the G10P1 peptide fraction against X. campestris was 12.5 μg mL-1. Electrophoresis of the G10P1 in a denaturant 15% polyacrylamide gel showed it to be composed of ~7.57 and ~5.6 kDa polypeptides, both associated with an area of strong antibacterial activity. The sequencing of 18 amino acids from the N-terminal of the ~7.57 peptides and 12 from the ~5.6 kDa peptides showed no clear association with previously described antimicrobial peptides. However, the ~5.6 kDa peptides were related to the NAC and WRKY transcription factors, both involved in direct regulation of the plant defense response against pathogen attack and the ~7.57 kDa peptides had low homology with a 3-oxo-[acyl-carrier-protein] synthase from Capsicum chinense.
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How to cite this article:

L. Brito-Argaez, F. Moguel-Salazar, F. Zamudio, T. Gonzalez-Estrada and I. Islas-Flores, 2009. Characterization of a Capsicum chinense Seed Peptide Fraction with Broad Antibacterial Activity. Asian Journal of Biochemistry, 4: 77-87.

DOI: 10.3923/ajb.2009.77.87

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajb.2009.77.87

COMMENTS
10 October, 2009
Josephthambi:
any capsaicin containing madicine are available in the market, but capsaicin activity donot mention. It is Protein synthesis and which compound it can inhibit either RNA polemarase or ribosomal subunits Thank you for seeing my points
14 October, 2009
Islas-Flores Ignacio:

Dear Joseph: Thank you for your interest in our work; during the experimental work we tested by HPLC the partially purified protein samples for the presence of capsaicin. According with results in these tests, capsaicin was absent from our purified protein sample. So, the recorded inhibitory activity was associated only with proteins. In the other hand, capsaicin in not a protein, it is a secondary metabolite which is biosynthesized from vanillylamine, a phenyl propanoid pathway intermediate, and fatty acid moieties in placental tissues of Capsicum fruits. There are many evidences that shows that capsaicin act as ligand in some particular cell receptors but until my knoledgement there is not evidence showing direct interation between capsaicin and RNA polymerase or capsaicin and Ribosomal subunits. Best Regards and

15 October, 2009
Josephthambi:

Sir Thank you for your reply I have a dought? you are saying below point C. annuum were very efficient in inhibiting growth in human and plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi. my dought -- in houses Generally prepared chatneys(stored) in bottles but in some times funges grown in the stored material the chatneys prepared mostly by using dry Capsicum chinense why the fugus growth is not inhibited If I wrote any mistakes please pardon me many many thanks with best regards U. josephthambi

16 October, 2009
Islas-Flores I.:

Dear Joseph: I enjoyed your example, that is really good and right. It shows that in nature there are complex interactions (coevolutions?, I do not know), Some years ago Flagan et al., (2006) published a manuscript showing that some kind of bacteria use capsaicin as its only source of nitrogen, after capsaicin was degraded, then additional groups of bacteria which naturally are unable to growth in capsaicin, start their own growth in the media, by using the degraded products.But please, check the book chapter The capsaicin: just as hot as hell?, in Recent. Res. Devel. Biochem. 6(2005):121-132 ISBN: 817736-297-6. The reference for Flagan et al. is Flagan SF and Leaddbetter JR (2006). Environ. Microbiol. 8: 1-6. Best Regards

 
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