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Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances
  Year: 2011 | Volume: 6 | Issue: 3 | Page No.: 201-227
DOI: 10.3923/ajava.2011.201.227
 
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Current Status of Fusarium Infection in Human and Animal

P.K. Jain, V.K. Gupta, A.K. Misra, R. Gaur, V. Bajpai and S. Issar

Abstract:
Fungi are extremely versatile class of organisms comprised mostly of saprophytes, grows on dead organic material. A relatively small number of fungal species have developed a parasitic lifestyle, associated with the ability to recognize and penetrate a specific host, exploit its nutrient reserves, overcome its innate defense responses and cause disease. Many organisms attacked by fungi encompasses evolutionary distinct groups from lower to higher eukaryotes, most prominently plants, insects and mammals, including humans. To cause disease, fungal pathogens rely on an arsenal of pathogenicity and virulence factors, which’s spatially and temporally correct deployment determines the basic pathogenic potential and the extent of infection, respectively. Being a common contaminant and a well-known plant pathogen, Fusarium sp. may cause various infections in humans. Fusarium is one of the emerging causes of opportunistic mycoses to human and animal. Up to date, approximate 15 species had been reported to cause human and animal diseases. Common species includes species are F. Solani (commonest), F. oxysporum, F. verticoides, F. proliferatum and F. anthophilum.
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How to cite this article:

P.K. Jain, V.K. Gupta, A.K. Misra, R. Gaur, V. Bajpai and S. Issar, 2011. Current Status of Fusarium Infection in Human and Animal. Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 6: 201-227.

DOI: 10.3923/ajava.2011.201.227

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajava.2011.201.227

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