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Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances
  Year: 2006 | Volume: 1 | Issue: 1 | Page No.: 89-98
DOI: 10.3923/ajava.2006.89.98
 
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Foreign Body Syndrome in Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis): An Emerging Threat

M.C. Sharma and Pankaj Kumar

Abstract:
Among several diseases of the bovine fore stomach, foreign body syndrome due to ingested foreign bodies in the buffaloes specially traumatic reticuloperitionitis and allied conditions has emerged out as a major problem affecting the productivity of the buffaloes and economy of the farmers of buffalo rearing countries worldwide. Foreign body syndrome (Iron mongery disease) can be defined as various conditions originating from ingestion of foreign bodies, typically a metallic objects, such as pieces of wire or a nail (Hardware disease) but sometimes non-metallic objects like stiff broom-bristles or sharp pieces of plastics and their lodgment into the reticulum, due to anatomical predisposition. Buffalo population in 1997 was 91.78 million which was 55% of the total world population and major contributor to the annual milk production of the country (FAO, 1999). The estimated growth rate in buffalo population from 1992-1999 was 10%. Thus signifies the reviewing of this condition in buffaloes and causes of emergence and related condition associated or resulting from it. The available literatures on various aspects of Foreign Body Syndrome in buffaloes have been reviewed under different headings.
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 RELATED ARTICLES:
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How to cite this article:

M.C. Sharma and Pankaj Kumar , 2006. Foreign Body Syndrome in Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis): An Emerging Threat. Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 1: 89-98.

DOI: 10.3923/ajava.2006.89.98

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajava.2006.89.98

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