Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Science Alert
 
Blue
   
Curve Top
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences
  Year: 2017 | Volume: 11 | Issue: 2 | Page No.: 96-107
DOI: 10.3923/ajas.2017.96.107
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail

Livestock Farming and Management: The Case of Meat Production and Processing in Rwanda

Hirwa Claire D`Andre , Ebong Cyprian, Mutabazi Jules, Mutimura Mupenzi, Nyirishema Felix and Wallace Paul Amponsah

Abstract:
Objective: This study was conducted with the aim of characterizing the existing meat value chain of Rwanda as well as examine its full potential. Materials and Methods: It was carried out in 192 households in six districts in Rwanda which engaged in all aspects of the cattle value chain. The districts were Nyagatare, Kirehe, Ngoma, Bugesera, Kayonza and Gatsibo. The occupants of the households were interviewed using structured questionnaires which aimed at eliciting a clear understanding of the production strategies, processing, marketing channels and attributes of the meat production and processing situation in the country. Results: The results showed that 90% of the respondents were producers, 1.2% butchers, 0.4% producers and fatteners, 0.8% fatteners while the rest (1.2%) wholly engaged in cattle production, fattening and trading. It was also realized that most of the youth engaged in grazing their cattle more than selling them. The results further highlighted that cattle production in Rwanda was a typically low input system with low initial capital investments. Average milk production was found to be 7-fold more than the live animal sales per household per year. However, the income realized from live sales were more than 100-fold the income generated from milk sales. It also came to light that four beef cattle value chains were operational in the cities and towns. Identified strategies to improve the existing value chains included the establishment of feedlots, buying of animals from smallholder farmers for fattening by commercial ranchers as well as exploiting domestic niches and regional markets. Conclusion: Since the size and weight of cattle were major determinants in pricing, cattle fattening based on crop residues could provide producers with more income. It was, therefore, envisaged that market-oriented beef value chain development would be an economically viable and socially acceptable investment option in Rwanda.
PDF Fulltext XML References Citation Report Citation
How to cite this article:

Hirwa Claire D`Andre, Ebong Cyprian, Mutabazi Jules, Mutimura Mupenzi, Nyirishema Felix and Wallace Paul Amponsah, 2017. Livestock Farming and Management: The Case of Meat Production and Processing in Rwanda. Asian Journal of Animal Sciences, 11: 96-107.

DOI: 10.3923/ajas.2017.96.107

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ajas.2017.96.107

COMMENT ON THIS PAPER
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Curve Bottom