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Articles by H. Amanlou
Total Records ( 5 ) for H. Amanlou
  V. Keshavarz , H. Amanlou , A. Nikkhah , M. Dehghan Banadaky , E. Mahjoubi and M. Kazemi Bonchenari
  The 18 multiparous close-up Holstein dairy cows averaging BW 791.1 (SD = 44.72) in 23 day (SD = 6) before expected calving date were assigned in a completely randomized design (n = 6) to study the effects of different levels of effective fiber on chewing activity, intake and nutrients digestibility in close-up and performance in the subsequent lactation. The effective fiber was considered as high 30.40, moderate 27.38 and low 24.61% for treatments H, M and L, respectively. All the cows were fed the same diet after parturition until 20 days in milk. Total chewing activity negatively affected by decreasing the effective fiber content in the diet. Total rumination time was 473, 443 and 408 min day-1 for treatments H, M and L, respectively (p<0.03). Pre-calving DMI was 12.07, 14.29 and 12.89 kg day-1, (p<0.0007) and post-calving DMI was 17.41, 19.03 and 18.72 for treatments H, M and L, respectively (p<0.0001). Milk yield (p<0.09) and milk protein yield (p<0.07) were tended to rise with decreasing the effective fiber but there was no effect on milk fat yield among treatments. The results showed that decreasing the effective fiber in close-up diets increased DMI in both pre and post calving. It was concluded that although the strategy of decreasing effective fiber content of the close-up diets increases DMI and improved energy balance in dairy cows, the severe decrease of effective fiber in close-up diets could negatively affect rumination time that possibly could have negative effects on cow health.
  T. Tanha , H. Amanlou , M. Chamani , Y. Ebrahimnezhad , R. Salamatdost , N. Maheri and M. Fathi
  The objective of this study was to investigate whether consuming of protected glutamine before and after parturition would affect biomarkers of oxidative stress, dry matter intake and production performance. Thirty six pregnant Holstein dairy cows were assigned into four treatment groups based on their BCS, parity and expected calving date in a completely randomized design. Treatment groups consisted of glutamine supplementation Before and After Calving (BFAF), glutamine supplementation before calving and without glutamine after it (BFAN) without glutamine before and glutamine supplementation after calving and (BNAF) and without glutamine pre and postpartum (BNAN). There were not any significant differences and interaction among treatments in DMI but DMI on days 21 was affected by post partum glutamine feeding. Milk yield was not affected by treatments. The Total Antioxidant Status (TAS) influenced by postpartum glutamine feeding and was most for BFAF and BNAF. The Plasma Glutathione Activity (PGA) was affected by pre and postpartum treatments and the effect of post calving feeding was more clear and there was only an interaction effect on 7 days.
  M.H. Palizdar , H. Sadeghipanah , H. Amanlou , H.R. Mohammadian-Tabrizi and A. Mirhadi
  Researchers utilized in vitro rumen gas production technique to evaluate soybean meal coated with different types and levels of hydrogenated fatty acids for total gas production, organic matter digestibility. The aim of this study was also to investigate the digestion kinetic of Soybean Meal (SBM) protected with different types: Hydrogenated Tallow (HT); Hydrogenated Palm oil (HP) and levels (0, 200, 400, 600 and 800 g kg-1) of fatty acids to decrease rumen digestibility of organic matter and Gas Production (GP). Approximately, 200 mg (DM basis) of sample is weighed and inserted in glass syringes then mixed with the inoculum and artificial saliva which the initial volume of the syringes reached to approximately 30 mL and incubated at 39°C in a ventilated oven. GP was recorded after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. There were differences among fat coated treatments and SBM in total GP at 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h of in vitro incubation and the treatments differed (p<0.01) in rate of and potential, gas production. The result of the present study showed that experimental fats which mixed by soybean meal to protect it from microbial fermentation, reduced in vitro digestibility of organic matter and GP during the time of incubation. In compare to HT, coating soybean meal with HP resulted in significant reduced GP (p<0.01). Furthermore, the values of b and a+b reduced significantly since, soybean meal coated with these two types of fat (p<0.01). It seems that one of the possible strategies to reduce total GP from dairy cows or feedlot cattle is coating some portions of dietary concentrate with supplemental fats in the form of hydrogenated free fatty acids like HT or HP. Accordingly a reduction in the fermentation rate of organic matter and proteins could reduce the total GP as NH3, CO2 and CH4 in the rumen and may provide more protein for absorption in the small intestine.
  M. Hossein Yazdi , H. Amanlou and E. Mahjoubi
  The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two levels of Crude Protein (CP) using Poultry by-Product Meal (PBPM) fed during late gestation on the performance, blood metabolites and colostrum composition of Holstein cows. Twenty multiparous cows 26±6 days before expected calving were assigned randomly to two treatments containing 1) 140 g kg-1 DM CP (34 g kg-1 DM PBPM) 2) 160 g kg-1 DM CP (75 g kg-1 DM PBPM). The cow’s BCS was 3.56±0.5 on average, at the beginning of the trial. Yields of milk, protein, lactose and fat were not affected by prepartum dietary CP level. Colostrum composition (fat, CP and total solids percents), blood metabolites (Ca, glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, urea N and cholesterol) and metabolic diseases incidence were not influenced by prepartum dietary CP level. There was no significant difference between treatments in body weight and BCS changes. As expected, blood urea N before calving was higher in the cows fed 160 g kg-1 DM CP diets (p<0.002). Serum cholesterol during prepartum (p<0.03) and postpartum (p<0.01) periods was significantly lower in 160 g kg-1 DM CP treatment. In general, although postpartum glucose level increased in cows which received 160 g kg-1 DM CP in the diet, it seems that there is no other obvious advantages over feeding the 140 g kg-1 DM CP diet. So feeding this level of CP diet to close up cows is recommended.
  T. Tanha , H. Amanlou , M. Chamani , Y. Ebrahimnezhad , R. Salamatdost , N. Maheri , M. Fathi and M. Abozar
  The objective of this study was to investigate whether consuming of Protected Glutamine (PG) before parturition in close up period would affect biomarkers of oxidative stress, immune system and Haptoglobin (HP) and Serum Amyloid A (SAA). About 36 pregnant Holstein dairy cows were assigned into two treatment groups based on their BCS and expected calving date in at student examination. Treatment groups consisted of glutamine supplementation 100 g day-1 per cow before calving (F), glutamine did not supplementation before calving (N). There were not any significantdifferences among treatments in DMI and BCS on 21, 14 and 7 days before parturation. There were not significant differences in the Total Antioxidant Status (TAS), Haptoglobin (HP), Serum Amyloid A (SAA), No Esterified Fatty Acids (NEFA) and blood and immune cells. The plasma Glutathione Peroxidase activity (GPX) was significant difference between two group and it seems that supplementation diets with glutamine on the close up period can enhanceplasma Glutathione Peroxidase activity (GPX).
 
 
 
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